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Frequently Asked Questions

 

You’ve got questions. We’ve got answers! Click on the questions below and learn more about our organization’s work for the LGBT community. If you don’t see the question you have below, contact us and we’ll get back to you as soon as we can.

 


About Our Proposed Nondiscrimination Ordinance

  • Would this ordinance apply to other cities within Mobile County?
    No. The ordinance would only apply to the City of Mobile and not other cities within Mobile County, such as Bayou La Batre, Chickasaw, Citronelle, Creola, Prichard, Saraland, Satsuma, or Semmes. These cities will not be required to adopt the ordinance.
  • Would this ordinance apply to Mobile area churches or private religious schools?
    No. The ordinance would clarify that it does not apply to Mobile area churches and private religious schools. These institutions will still be allowed to hire or fire their own employees according to their church’s doctrines.

About Sexual Orientation, Gender Identity and Sex Conditions

  • What do the acronyms LGBT and LGBTQIA stand for?
    The acronym LGBT stands for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender . Some communities have started using the acronym LGBTQIA standing for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, queer (or questioning), intersex, and asexual to be inclusive of more sexual orientations, gender identities, and sex conditions.
  • What does the term sexual orientation mean?
    According to the Human Rights Campaign, the term sexual orientation is the preferred term used when referring to an individual’s physical and/or emotional attraction to the same and/or opposite gender. A person’s sexual orientation is distinct from a person’s gender identity and expression.
  • What are some examples of sexual orientations?
    • Heterosexual – A person who experiences sexual and/or romantic attraction to the opposite gender.
    • Lesbian – A woman who experiences sexual and/or romantic attraction to their own gender.
    • Gay – A man who experiences sexual and/or romantic attraction to their own gender.
    • Bisexual – A person who experiences sexual and/or romantic attraction to their own gender and opposite genders.
    • Asexual – A person who does not experience sexual attraction to any gender, and may or may not experience romantic attraction to one or more genders. Asexual people can be hetero-romantic, bi-romantic, homo-romantic, or a-romantic.
  • What do the terms gender identity and gender expression mean?
    According to the Human Rights Campaign, the term gender identity, distinct from the term sexual orientation, refers to a person’s innate, deeply felt psychological identification as a man, woman or some other gender, which may or may not correspond to the sex assigned to them at birth (e.g., the sex listed on their birth certificate).

    The term gender expression refers to all of the external characteristics and behaviors that are socially defined as either masculine or feminine, such as dress, grooming, mannerisms, speech patterns and social interactions. Social or cultural norms can vary widely and some characteristics that may be accepted as masculine, feminine or neutral in one culture may not be assessed similarly in another.

  • What do the terms transgender and cisgender mean?
    According to the Human Rights Campaign, the term transgender – or trans – is an umbrella term for people whose gender identity or expression is different from those typically associated with the sex assigned to them at birth (e.g., the sex listed on their birth certificate).

    Conversely, cisgender – or cis – is the term used to describe people whose gender identity or expression aligns with those typically associated with the sex assigned to them at birth.

  • What does the term intersex mean?
    According to the OII-USA, the term intersex refers to people born with (or who develop naturally in puberty) chromosomes, genitals, hormones and/or gonads that do not fit typical definitions of male or female. The most thorough existing research found intersex births to constitute 1.7% of the population. However, given that only some intersex clinical patients’ records are used as data, the figure is likely to be substantially higher.

Additional Resources